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Romance, Revolution and Reform is an interdisciplinary PGR-led  journal on the 19th Century, run in association with the Southampton Centre for Nineteenth-Century Research.

The Journal is committed to helping new researchers publish their work in addition to acting as a forum for the discussion of new ideas in the field of Nineteenth-Century Studies.

ISSN 2517-7850

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Deputy Editor: Katie Holdway

University of Southampton, UK

SO17 1BJ

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Issue 1 (April 2019):

Regionalism Across the World in the Nineteenth Century

Anthologies, Periodicals and the Press: Publicising Manchester Poetry in the early 1840s.
Author:
Harry Bark (University of Oxford)
Keywords:
Poetry, Anthologies, Periodicals, Manchester, Gender, Regionalism
Abstract:
This paper takes a bibliographic approach to the engagement with and promotion of Manchester poetry within the city in the early 1840s. It focuses on two poetry anthologies produced by Manchester cultural societies (The Festive Wreath (1842) and Athenæum Souvenir (1843)) and considers the position of local poetry in the short-lived The North of England Magazine . The paper argues that poetry was key in negotiating an early-Victorian cultural identity for the city, as literary-minded communities sought to defy the reputation of Manchester as a site of mere industry whilst countering the growing literary and publishing dominance of London. The role of women poets within these communities is also considered, and the paper points towards potential future areas of research, beyond a bibliographic focus, that will enrich understandings of the cultural identity and negotiations of the Cottonopolis in the 1840s.
Author Biography:

Harry Bark studied for a BA in English Literature at the University of Leeds and recently completed an MSt in English (1830-1914) at the University of Oxford.

 

Email: 

harry.bark@sjc.ox.ac.uk
Click here to download the article